The AHA says a JAMA study on what hospitals charge insurers for clinician-administered drugs lacks context.

AHA Criticizes JAMA Study of What Hospitals Charge for Clinician-Administered Drugs

The American Hospital Association (AHA) has pushed back on a JAMA Internal Medicine study suggesting that leading acute care facilities that are 340B covered entities have wide variations in how much they charge insurers for clinician-administered drugs.

That study, by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, focused on a sampling of the top-rated hospitals by U.S. News and World Report. It concluded that those hospitals’ negotiated prices for drugs ranged from 169% to 344% higher than the standard Medicare payment rate of average sales price (ASP) +6%, while self-pay prices were 149% to 306% higher than the Medicare standard rate. “The gap between pharmaceutical acquisition costs and hospital charges is particularly wide for 340B entities,” the authors noted.

The American Hospital Association (AHA) has pushed back on a JAMA Internal Medicine study suggesting that leading acute care facilities that are 340B covered entities have wide variations in how much they charge insurers for clinician-administered drugs.

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