Our six-part investigative series takes an in-depth look into a question often asked by 340B providers: Why can’t they access 340B pricing on one of Bristol Myers Squibb/Celgene’s most profitable drug products? We also delve into serious fraud allegations, Congressional oversight, and the possibility of a renewed focus on this contentious area under new leadership at the U.S. Health and Human Services Department. Throughout the series, we also provide BMS/Celgene's viewpoint, their justification for their drug pricing practices, limited distribution policies and why they believe they are following the law.

Bristol Myers Squibb/Celgene Myeloma Drugs: Patient-Safety or Profit Motive? Part 6

As we described in Parts 2 and 3 of this series, in 2018, an ex-Celgene vice president responsible for the company’s 340B program compliance alleged in a whistleblower lawsuit that Celgene’s reason for limiting Revlimid, Pomalyst, and Thalomid’s distribution is “to deny access to the drugs at the [340B] ceiling price,” saving the company hundreds of millions of dollars per year.

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